Processing Can be Overrated

Sometimes processing can be overrated.

Hear me out on this. It’s not that it’s not important to process events or circumstances, it’s just that sometimes the processing can get in the way of what you’re supposed to be learning.

Sometimes processing keeps us from healing or moving forward. It can keep us from becoming whole or complete because the actual act of processing can be overwhelming and unending.

Processing is important, but moving on from processing is just as important. It’s the next level of healing, the next step in coming to terms with our own humanity, and the next phase in moving on.

So take the time to process, but give yourself permission to heal and move on.

The Most Stubborn Habits…

“The most stubborn habits which resist change with the greatest tenacity are those which worked well for a space of time and led to the practitioner being rewarded for those behaviors. If you suddenly tell such persons that their recipe for success is no longer viable, their personal experience belies your diagnosis. The road to convincing them is hard. It is the stuff of classic tragedy.” Charles Hampden-Turner and Linda Arc

Crockpots versus Microwaves

When deciding what to cook, it’s important to make sure that you are using the correct equipment to get the right results. You either want your meal to come out tasty and savory or quick and fast. Above all else, you want it to be edible.

You have several different choices to make this happen, but for tasty and savory I choose a crockpot. If I want it quick and fast, I choose a microwave. It’s important to know the difference between a crockpot versus a microwave.

Crockpots aren’t necessarily slow, they just utilize energy differently than microwaves. Microwaves disrupts and sometimes mutates the molecular structure through waves of energy thus creating heat whereas crockpots create energy through intentional and sustained heat. This is why you cook a pot roast in a crockpot and a hot pocket in the microwave. You want the molecular structure of the pot roast to stay the same, you’re hoping that the hot pocket’s molecular structure will change into something remotely healthy.

Do You Have to go to Church?

The simple answer is No. You don’t have to go to church.

But you do have to be part of the body of Christ. And the very best way to be part of the body is to create intentional and purposeful opportunities to build relationships with others in the body. That is best done through serving and worshiping alongside one another.

You can do this in a variety of ways, however, the simplest way is to discipline yourself to attend a weekly gathering where you have the opportunity to engage and serve with members of the body whom you wouldn’t normally encounter in your day to day life.

Is the Bible a Start or an End?

I read this quote somewhere, but I can’t find the link. However, it’s so good that I wanted to share it with you.

The Bible in Jesus world was a scroll that you saw someone reading in the center of the room, in the midst of community.

And then you all discussed it. You surrounded the words…you encircled them literally, physically…and then you engaged with them. Together.

It was a communal experience.

Picture all that energy swirling around the room, picture all those opinions, picture really wise people saying interesting and profound things, picture that crazy uncle rambling on and on and making no sense.

And then you’d come back next week and do it all over again.

The Torah started the discussion.

For many in our world, the Bible ends the discussion.

Age Effectiveness in the Local Church

I’ve been thinking about the effectiveness that age brings to the local church. It seems to me, that as leaders in the church, we fall into three separate age groups of effectiveness.

Ages 20 to 35
From age 20 to 35 – you’re learning and establishing what kind of pastor you will be – education, influence, success and failures. Lots of rebellion, lots of hard times, lots of growing. You can fight with older pastors/churches – but you aren’t going to win.

Ages 35 to 55
From age 35 to 55 – you are building the culture of the church. The culture is established by what you determine is important, how well you lead your church, how well you disciple the people in your church, etc. You are trying to recruit people younger then you and learn from people older than you while creating the church that God has placed in your heart.

Ages 55 and beyond
From age 55 and beyond – you are simply a caretaker for the next generation. They aren’t going to do church the way you want them to. It’s going to look different. It’s going to feel different. They are going to treat the church differently then you would. And you can fight it or you can trust that God knows what He’s doing by putting these people in charge. The worst thing you can do is complain about the younger generation.

How do you see age effectiveness in the local church?